Fix for Outlook 2007 Trying to Load InfoPath (Error 1605)

Just ran into this situation after a client uninstalled & reinstalled Office 2007 Pro. When Outlook was opened, it complained twice about being unable to open InfoPath because it wasn’t installed.

I found multiple other complaints about this, but no solutions (though some suggested removing and reinstalling Office). A bit of digging with SysInternals’ Process Monitor, turned up mention of not finding the somewhat promising value “DisableInfopathForms,” so I took a stab and created the value as a DWORD under the location ProcMon was reporting. Setting the value to 1 cleared the problem on Outlook startup.

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Article on Open Source vs. Proprietary EMRs and Stimulus

The July issue of Washington Monthly has an interesting article on the relative merits of open source (specifically VistA) electronic medical records and proprietary / closed-source systems (including mentions of Cerner and Epic Systems). It covers some of the advantages of having a good EMR system in place, particularly for hospitals and hospital networks.

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Winlogon.exe at 50% or 100% CPU (Fix)

There are apparently a variety of things that can cause the winlogon.exe process on Windows PCs to consume all available CPU, but I’ve found few references to this cause – corruption in Offline Files, even when Offline Files is disabled on the PC, on the server and on the domain (via Group Policy). Depending on the age of the PC, this will consume either 50% of the CPU (on newer dual-core systems) or 100% of the CPU (on older systems). This is the only non-malware winlogon.exe problem that I recall personally encountering.

Update: The original title & article indicated that this applied to Windows PCs on domains only, but Offline Files is available to non-domain PCs as well as long as Fast User Switching is not turned on.

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Compliment Comments and Spam

Because of a standard configuration of many WordPress blogs, it’s not uncommon to get comments containing nothing but a generic compliment. These frequently also have a site like google.com listed as the commenter’s website and/or an email address from China (.cn) or Russia (.ru).

These generic compliment comments are part one of a two-stage spam attack.

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